Church Musicians

I’ve noticed that a number of you are musicians here (generally helping with the music at your churches). I figured I’d pose these question(s), since I’m genuinely curious.

  1. What instrument(s) do you play?
  2. Do you do anything outside of regular practice to improve on your instrument (voice included)?
  3. Do you have any resources that have changed your perspective on how you play in the church?
  4. What’s your favorite song(s) to play?

To answer these questions for myself:

1. What instrument(s) do you play?

Guitar (Electric primarily but also Acoustic on occasion), Drums, and Vocals.

2. Do you do anything outside of regular practice to improve on your instrument (voice included)?

I’m still searching here. I generally ascribe to the idea of “touching the keys” as much as possible. Even if all I do is pick up my guitar, or sing along to some songs. I definitely think that’s the most beneficial, but I would like to try to get more out of my technique and get better at specific things (singing harmony and playing riffs on electric guitar).

3. Do you have any resources that have changed your perspective on how you play in the church?

The greatest influence in changing my perspective on music in church is likely Bob Kauflin. He has helped me hone in on the purpose of corporate music and what musical worship should look like.

4. What’s your favorite song(s) to play?

This is a tough one. It varies constantly. Despite me being primarily an electric guitar player, I love Rend Collective’s energy + sound. I really love playing their song(s), “Nailed To The Cross” and “Joy of the Lord”.

I’m most certainly NOT a musician, but wish I was. I’ve debated picking up harmonica a couple times, but alas, I’m better off on the sound board. :man_shrugging:

Definitely keeping an eye on this topic.

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@joebuhlig I’d be curious on how you hone your gift of mixing. :blush: To me mixing is an instrument unto itself.

The biggest key is listening to what I hear when listening to music in headphones or the car. I figure those are professionals in their element. That helps me tune my ear to what should be happening.

Everything else is simply a matter of learning how a console works and what the pieces do. What is a gate/PEQ/compressor/limiter/de-esser/etc…? And when are they typically used? Those simply take time to pick up and require someone to teach you. So I’ve been very strategic in finding time with people who are much better at it than I am.

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I mostly cantor, and I find the best resource to do a good job is to spend some time in adoration before the Mass.

Perspective on how to lead worship music changes when you read the early Church fathers.

Favorite songs are the old time hymns with some real theological meat to them!

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